ISSN: 2424-8002 (Online)

ISSN: 2424-7723 (Print)

Journal Abbreviation: Int J Bioprint

Publication Frequency: Quarterly

Article Processing Charges (APC): Click here for more details

Publishing Model: Open Access

Impact Factor: 6.638

Journal no: 10P


(In progress)

Table of Contents

Original research article

by Shugang Hu, Zijie Meng, Junpeng Zhou, Yongwei Li, Yanwen Su, Qi Lei, Mao Mao, Xiaoli Qu, Jiankang He, Wei Wang

Micro/sub-microscale fibrillar architectures of extracellular matrix play important roles in regulating cellular behaviors such as attachment, migration, and differentiation. However, the interactions between cells and organized micro/sub-microscale fibers have not been fully clarified yet. Here, the responses of MC3T3-E1 cells to electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printed

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Original research article

Jianghong Huang, Xiaoling Lei, Zhiwang Huang, Zhibin Rong, Haihang Li, Yixin Xie, Li Duan, Jianyi Xiong, Daping Wang, Shihui Zhu, Yujie Liang, Jianhao Wang, Jiang Xia

Artificial skins are biomaterials that can replace the lost skin or promote the regeneration of damaged skin. Skin regenerative biomaterials are highly applauded because they can exempt patients with severe burns from the painful procedure of autologous skin transplantation. Notwithstanding decades of research, biocompatible, degradable, and printable biomaterials that can effectively promote skin regeneration as a transplantation replacement in clinical use are still scarce. Here, we report one

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Original research article

by Cristina Borràs-Novell, Mario García Causapié, Maria Murcia, Damien Djian, óscar García-Algar

Non-invasive masks are designed based on generic facial models; therefore, difficulties in fitting patients’ unique characteristics are common. A poor fit of the mask may have consequences such as air leaks or pressure ulcers. It is possible to optimize the fit of interfaces by adapting them to a patient’s face. Our objective is to design an

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Original research article

by Xin Jiao, Xin Sun, Wentao Li, Wenxiang Chu, Yuxin Zhang, Yiming Li, Zengguang Wang, Xianhao Zhou, Jie Ma, Chen Xu, Kerong Dai, Jinwu Wang, Yaokai Gan

Bone defect is a serious orthopedic disease which has been studied for a long time. Alternative degradable biomaterials are required for bone repairing and regeneration to address the limitation of autogenous bone. β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is an alternative material with good cytocompatibility and has been used in bone defect treatment. However, whether β-TCP contributes to osteogenesis of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) through N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification remains unkno

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Original research article

by Rashik Chand, Beni Shimwa Muhire, Sanjairaj Vijayavenkataraman

Wall shear stress is the most critical factor in determining the viability of cells during the bioprinting process, and controlling wall shear stress remains a challenge in extrusion bioprinting. We investigated the effect of various bioprinting parameters using computational simulations on maximum wall shear stress (MWSS) in the nozzle to optimize the bioprinting process. Steady-state simulations were done for three nozzle geometries (conical, tapered conical, and cylindrical) with varying nozzle

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Original research article

by Yangyi Zhang, Jianfu Xia, Jiye Zhang, Jinlei Mao, Hao Chen, Hui Lin, Pan Jiang, Xinzhong He, Xiaodong Xu, Mingzhu Yin, Zhifei Wang

Rapid development of three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has enabled the production of many new materials for medical applications but the dry laboratory surgical training model made of soft and flexible materials is still insufficient. We established a new 3D-printed Nissen fundoplication training model of which materials simulate the real mechanical properties. In this study, 16 participants were divided into two groups: Experimental group and control group. The validity of model was

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Original research article

by Adam A. Mieloch, Julia A. Semba, Jakub Dalibor Rybka

At present, one of the main limitations of three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting in tissue engineering stems from a scarcity of biomaterials tailored for specific applications. Widely used hydrogels offer an optimal printability and a suitable environment for cell growth; however, they lack the mechanical strength required for non-soft tissues, for example, cartilage, tendons, and meniscus. This work investigated the physicochemical, mechanical, and biological characteristics of a 3D-printed polycaprolactone

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Original research article

by Chengjin Wang, Yang Yang, Jingyuan Ji, Yongcong Fang, Liliang Ouyang, Lei Zhang, Wei Sun

Intimal hyperplasia and restenosis caused by excessive proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMC) are the main factors for the failure of stent implantation. Drug-eluting stents carried with antiproliferative drugs have emerged as a successful approach to alleviate early neointimal development. However, these agents have been reported to have an undesirable effect on re-endothelialization. In this study, we proposed an integrated bioresorbable stent coated with dipyridamole (DP)-loaded poly(D,L-lactide)

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Original research article

by Jihun Lee, Jaebum Sung, Jung Ki Jo, Hongyun So

This paper presents novel umbrella-shaped flexible devices to prevent vesicoureteral reflux along double-J stents, which is a backward flow of urine from the bladder to the kidney and is a critical issue in patients with urinary stones. The anti-reflux devices were designed to mechanically attach to the stent and were manufactured using three-dimensional (3D) printing and polymer casting methods. Based on the umbrella shapes, four different devices were manufactured, and the antireflux efficiency wa

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Original research article

by Peifang Dee, Sharlene Tan, Hortense Le Ferrand

Natural materials such as bone and enamel have intricate microstructures with inorganic minerals oriented to perform multiple mechanical and biological functions. Current additive manufacturing methods for biominerals from the calcium phosphate (CaP) family enable fabrication of custom-shaped bioactive scaffolds with controlled pore structures for patient-specific bone repair. Yet, these scaffolds do not feature intricate microstructures similar to those found in natural materials. In this work, we

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Original research article

by Rong Li, Xuan Liu, Xin Yuan, Shanshan Wu, Li Li, Xuebing Jiang, Bo Li, Xian Jiang, Maling Gou

Hollow microneedle patches (HMNPs) have great promise for efficient and precise transdermal drug delivery in a painless manner. Currently, the clinical application of HMNPs is restricted by its complex manufacturing processes. Here, we use a new three-dimensional (3D) printing technology, static optical projection lithography (SOPL), for the fast fabrication of HMNPs. In this technology, a light beam

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Original research article

by Zoi Kanaki, Chrysoula Chandrinou, Ioanna-Maria Orfanou, Christina Kryou, Jill Ziesmer, Georgios A. Sotiriou, Apostolos Klinakis, Constantin Tamvakopoulos, Ioanna Zergioti

Cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs remains to be challenging to the physician due to limitations associated with lack of efficacy or high toxicities. Typically, chemotherapeutic drugs are administered intravenously, leading to high drug concentrations that drive efficacy but also lead to known side effects. Delivery of drugs through transdermal microneedles (MNs) has become an important alternative

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Review article

by Yanfang Wang, Jiejie Wang, Ziyu Ji, Wei Yan, Hong Zhao, Wenhua Huang, Huan Liu

Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is an emerging technology that is widely used in regenerative medicine. With the continuous development of the technology, it has attracted great attention and demonstrated promising prospects in ophthalmologic applications. In this paper, we review the three main types of 3D bioprinting technologies: Vat polymerization based bioprinting, extrusion-based bioprinting, and

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Short communication

by Jun Yi-Wu, Chih-Hua Hsieh, Zheng-Ying Lin

Present methods used in three-dimensional (3D) printing, such as selective laser sintering (SLS) and multijet fusion (MJF), have limited applications, especially in relation to the manufacturing of biomedical products. The speed of SLS printing is too low, and high-speed 3D

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Short communication

by Kevin Tröndle, Guilherme Miotto, Ludovica Rizzo, Roman Pichler, Fritz Koch, Peter Koltay, Roland Zengerle, Soeren S. Lienkamp, Sabrina Kartmann, Stefan Zimmermann

We used arrays of bioprinted renal epithelial cell spheroids for toxicity testing with cisplatin. The concentration dependent cell death rate was determined using a lactate dehydrogenase assay. Bioprinted spheroids showed enhanced sensitivity to the treatment in comparison to monolayers of the same cell type. The measured dose-response curves revealed an inhibitory concentration of the spheroids

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Methods

by Changxi Liu, Jia Liu, Chengliang Yang, Yujin Tang, Zhengjie Lin, Long Li, Hai Liang, Weijie Lu, Liqiang Wang

Bioprinting is an emerging multidisciplinary technology for organ manufacturing, tissue repair, and drug screening. The manufacture of organs in a layer-by-layer manner is a characteristic of bioprinting technology, which can also determine the accuracy of constructs confined by the printing resolution. The lack of sufficient resolution will result in defect generation during the printing process and the inability to

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Author Guidelines

Before submitting for publication, please ensure that your paper and other supplementary files have been prepared and formatted in accordance with the guidelines below.

In addition to referring to the Author Guidelines set out in the following, we also recommend using our templates to prepare the submission files.

Templates:

- Title page & back matter template   Download

- Article template for Original Research Article and Short Communication   Download

- Article template for Review Article and Perspective Article   Download 

 

Submission structure, general style and format

International Journal of Bioprinting requests that every new submission should be made and accompanied by 3 separate core files, namely manuscript, title page and back matter, and cover letter, whereas resubmission of revision file should be accompanied by 4 separate core files, namely manuscript, title page and back matter, cover letter, and response/rebuttal letter (collectively known as the revision file). Provision of supplementary files and/or confidential accessory files is optional or dependent on the nature of study and findings relevance. The table below briefly summarizes the type of files in a submission, their respective requirements and included items:

Type of file

File format

Requirements

Included items

(1) Manuscript

DOC or DOCX

- Use 1.5-spacing and format text in one column

- Use page numbers and continuous line numbers

- Font and size: Times New Roman, 12

- Insert tables and figures at the back of manuscript

- Manuscript title

- Abstract (for original research article, review article and perspective article)

- Keywords

- Text

- References

- Tables (including caption and legend)

- Figures (including caption and legend)

 

Note: Do not include any author-related information, including authorship list and affiliation in the manuscript file.

(2) Title page and back matter#

DOC or DOCX

- Use 1.5-spacing and format text in one column

- Font and size: Times New Roman, 12

On the first page (title page):

- Manuscript title

- Authorship list (first and last names must be spelled out)

- Author’s affiliation, including department, institution, city, state, postal code, and country (indicated with superscript number)

- Corresponding author information, including asterisk indication, mailing address and email

- Indication of equally contributing authors (if any) with dagger symbol

 

On the second page (back matter):

- Acknowledgments

- Funding

- Conflict of interest (mandatory)

- Author contributions (formatted as per CRediT)

- Ethics approval and consent to participate

- Consent for publication

- Availability of data

- Further disclosure about presentation of essential findings in conference(s) and/or upload of the paper to a preprint server

(3) Cover letter

DOC or DOCX

- Use 1.5-spacing and format text in one column

- Font and size: Times New Roman, 12

- A brief explanation of what was previously known, the conceptual advancement with the findings and its significance to broad readership

- A statement that “neither the manuscript nor any significant part of it is under consideration for publication elsewhere or has appeared elsewhere in a manner that could be construed as a prior or duplication of the same work” with author confirmation

- If any, associated accession numbers or DOIs of the corresponding preprint version of the submission

- [Optional] Name, affiliation and email address of up to 4 academically qualified (recommended) reviewers and/or name and affiliation of individuals who should be excluded from reviewing the submitted works on the grounds of conflict of interest

(4) Supplementary files

 

- Supplementary files should not exceed 20 MB in total (15MB individual file limit)

 

- Supplementary tables or figures

DOC or DOCX

- Use 1.5-spacing and format text in one column

- Use page numbers and continuous line numbers

- Font and size: Times New Roman, 12

- Include both supplementary tables (editable) and figures (in JPEG, PNG or TIFF format) in the same file

- Supplementary tables

- Supplementary figures

- Data set

XLS or XLSX

- All data should be neatly presented using consistent fonts

 

- Videos

MP4

- If necessary, trim the video clip to focus only on essential parts, such as experimental procedures and findings or observation that can only be demonstrated using video(s)

- Avoid unnecessary narrations that can be presented in written form

 

(5) Confidential accessory files

 

 

 

- Sample consent form (for human research only)

DOC, DOCX, PDF, JPEG, PNG or TIFF

- This is a sample, unsigned consent form that should bear the institution letterhead

 

- Research ethics proof (for human and/or animal research only)

DOC, DOCX, PDF, JPEG, PNG or TIFF

- Ideally, this document should contain the essential research ethics information, such as ethics approval identifiers and the name of Institutional Ethics Review Board or Institutional Review Board

- The research described in original research article should match the proposed research or significantly fit within the framework of the specification stipulated in the research ethics proof

 

(6) Response/rebuttal letter (only applicable to revisions)

DOC or DOCX

- All comments/feedback and responses/rebuttals must be clearly and concisely presented

- Reviewers’ comments and feedback

- Authors’ responses

# Ideally, all information given in the title page and back matter file, except for the manuscript title, should remain the same from the point of submission to paper acceptance. Thus, authors are responsible to ensure that all information therein is accurate before making submission. Refer to Authorship and Author Information for more information about International Journal of Bioprinting’s authorship policy.

Submitting authors should refer to the relevant sections in the following for more detailed information.

 

Author metadata during submission

During the submission process, the submitting author must ensure that all particulars of author information, including full name, affiliation, and email address, are given in the author metadata column of the submission system. These particulars must exactly reflect those on the title page of the submission; this includes the author order of the authorship list. Provide authors’ ORCID ID, if available.

 

Article types 

(1) Original research article

An original research article is based on original, basic and applied research and/or analysis. This type of article aims to describe significant and novel research. Authors of original research articles must confirm that the essential findings presented have never been published or under consideration elsewhere.

This article type typically has at least 5 tables and/or figures in total, approximately 40 references, and 7,000 words (inclusive of Abstract and References).

 

(2) Review article

A review article provides scholarly survey as well as balanced summarization and highlights of recent developments in a research field or emerging/future trends. Authors should ensure that all perspectives from different works are linked in balanced and cohesive manner, taking into consideration different schools of thought.

This article type typically has at least 5 tables and/or figures in total, approximately 70 references, and 7,000 words (inclusive of Abstract and References).

 

(3) Perspective article

A perspective article contains the author's scholarly opinions on a particular subject area or topic. Unlike a review, a perspective article covers a more specific part of the field, aiming to provide new insights into the subject matter. However, these perspectives or opinions should be objective in line with the spirit of academia. A good perspective piece should stimulate further discussions and initiate novel experiments.

This article type typically has 5 tables and/or figures in total, approximately 70 references, and 7,000 words (inclusive of Abstract and References).

 

(4) Short communication

A short communication is a short article that presents original and significant findings on a particular problem or novel findings that are anticipated to have significant impact.

The length of a short communication, including the Abstract and References, should not exceed 4,000 words. The article should contain Abstract (not more than 150 words), Background, Materials and Method, Results, Discussion, Conclusion and References, and contain no more than 5 figures and/or tables. Typically, this manuscript type has 15 references.

 

(5) Commentary

A commentary contains unsolicited commentaries or analysis from the reader(s) targeting specific published articles in the journal.

This manuscript type typically has 3 tables and figures in total, approximately 20 references, and 3,500 words (inclusive of Abstract and References).

 

(6) Clinical case study

A clinical case study presents the details and results from the clinical application of bioprinted products or equivalents on patient cases, and highlights specific instances of interesting phenomena. Submissions will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figures in total, approximately 20 references, and 3,000 words (inclusive of Abstract and References).

 

(7) Methods

A methods article presents new or improved version of experimental methods, tests or procedures pertaining to the field of bioprinting.

This manuscript type typically has 10 tables and figures in total, approximately 30 references, and 5,000 words (inclusive of Abstract and References).

 

(8) Report

A report summarizes the execution of a collaborative research program that is directly related to the advancement of bioprinting. Submissions are usually solicited by the editors.

This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figure in total, 20 references, and 5,000 words (inclusive of Abstract and References).

 

(9) Position paper

A position paper reflects the official opinion of an organization (e.g., government body, funding agency, etc.).

This manuscript type typically has 2 tables and/or figures in total, no more than 15 references, and 3,500 words (inclusive of References). An Abstract is not required in a position paper.

 

(10) Book review

A book review provides an overview of new publications (books) from the area of bioprinting. Brief summary, focus, argumentation and impact of the book should be provided.

A book review is typically of the length of 400-500 words. No Abstract, References, figures and tables are required.

 

(11) Extended conference paper

An extended conference paper is the conference paper version of an original research article that presents the new findings and in-depth discussion of a certain topic.

The manuscripts that do not have relevance to the Focus and Scope of International Journal of Bioprinting will be rejected.

The requirements for an extended conference papers are as follows:

- An extended conference paper must have at least 30% new material and include a citation to the conference paper. In addition to the 30% new material which is acquired through additional experimentation, analyses and proposal of new ideas or theories, the original content that can be found in the conference paper must be paraphrased, i.e., rewriting the sentences or changing the sentence structure. The 30% new material may also include the clarifications in response to questions raised during the presentation at the conference.

- An extended conference paper must have a new title and a new abstract that are different from the corresponding title in the conference paper. Nevertheless, the new title and new abstract must retain the ‘motivation, methods and conclusions’ of the paper presented at the conference presentation. More data in the form of tables and figures should be added. The results should be discussed in-depth with more examples and explanations. In this regard, more references will be needed.

- The conference paper must be cited.

- A PDF copy of the conference paper must be submitted along with the submission of the Extended Conference Paper.

- The format and style of an extended conference paper are similar to those of an original research article. Refer to the specific requirements of the original research article.

The pre-screening of a new submission of extended conference paper will be processed as per the requirements set out in the above, alongside the current, existing pre-screening criteria.

 

(12) Letter

This article type is a collection of unsolicited letters from the readers who wish to comment on specific articles published in International Journal of Bioprinting or another field-related journal. Alternatively, a letter can be written on an unrelated topic of interest to the journal’s readership.

Ideally, a letter should present an in-depth, scholarly re-analysis of a previously published article in International Journal of Bioprinting or in another field-related journal, accompanied by the reader’s constructive insights and comments. Letters containing new ideas, supporting data or data criticizing the indicated article may be subjected to peer review at editors’ discretion. Authors should specify the intended recipient of the letters, i.e., Editor or specific author(s).

This article type typically has no more than 3 tables and/or figures in total, no more than 20 references, and 2,000 words (inclusive of References). No Abstract is required.

 

(13) Editorial

An editorial piece is a solicited, concise commentary that highlights prominent topics in particular issue. Alternatively, an editorial represents the official opinions of the editors on the journal or special issue.

An editorial piece should not exceed 1,000 words (inclusive of References). Typically, an Abstract is not required and only 1 figure or table is allowed.

 

(14) Erratum

An erratum is a notification of a significant error made by the editors that affects the scholarly record or the scientific integrity of a published article. An erratum is always accompanied by Publisher Correction of the error. The corrections will not be made directly in the already-published articles. Authors who notice an error in their published articles should contact the editors at editor@whioce.com.

All publisher-introduced changes will be highlighted to the author for proofreading before final publication of the erratum.

 

(15) Corrigendum

A corrigendum is a notification of an important error made by the author(s) that affects the scholarly record or the scientific integrity of a published article. A corrigendum is always accompanied by Author Correction of the error. The corrections will not be made directly in the already-published articles.

If certain errors are found, author(s) should contact the editors at editor@whioce.com, who will evaluate the impact of the errors and decide on the appropriate course of action. The publication of any corrections to a paper is at the sole discretion of the editors.

 

Language

All submissions must be written entirely in good American English. Submissions in good British English can be accepted as long as a mixture of spelling variants are not used in the submissions. Clarity and conciseness are critical requirements for publications; therefore, submissions that are not clearly written will be returned to authors. Authors must ensure that their manuscripts are submit-ready or publish-ready before making submission. The articles published in International Journal of Bioprinting are in adherence with the publishable standards of academic and scientific writing.

Please note that utilizing a language editing service is not a guarantee of acceptance.

 

Letter capitalization

Use sentence case capitalization in all aspects of the submission. In sentence case, most major and minor words are lowercase (proper nouns, including name of organizations and name of guidelines, are an exception in that they are always capitalized for the first letter of each word, except for minor words, such as conjunctions and short prepositions). The first letter of the first word should always be uppercase.

 

Manuscript title

The title should capture the conceptual significance for a broad audience. The title should not be more than 50 words and should be able to give readers an overall view of the paper’s significance. Titles should avoid using uncommon jargons, abbreviations and punctuation.

 

Abstract

The purpose of abstract is to provide sufficient information and capture essential findings and/or messages of the paper. The length of an abstract should be in the range of 200-400 words. The abstract should be unstructured. Abstract is not needed in position paper, book review, letter, and editorial.

 

Keywords

Each submission should be accompanied by 3-6 keywords. Avoid using abbreviations and acronyms in keywords, unless they are established standard keywords. Separate keywords with semi-colons (i.e., Key word 1; Key word 2; Key word 3).

 

Abbreviations and acronyms

Define abbreviations and acronyms upon their first appearance, separately, in the abstract, main text, table legends, and figure captions and legends.

 

Sections in article

(1) Section headings

Section headings should be in boldface. Examples of section headings of different levels are shown in the following:

Primary level              : 1. Heart disease

Secondary level          : 1.3. Risk factors for heart disease

Tertiary level               : 1.3.2. Hypertension

Authors are suggested NOT to introduce further sub-sections after the tertiary level section (e.g., 1.3.2.1. High-salt diet).

 

(2) Special sectioning requirements for an original research article

  • Introduction. The introduction should provide a background that gives a broad readership an overall outlook of the field and the research performed. It tackles a problem and states its important regarding with the significance of the study. Introduction can conclude with a brief statement of the aim of the work and a comment about whether that aim was achieved.
  • Materials and Methods. This section provides the general experimental design and methodologies used. The aim is to provide enough detail to for other investigators to fully replicate the results. It is also required to facilitate better understanding of the results obtained. Protocols and procedures for new methods must be included in detail for the reproducibility of the experiments. Informed consent should be obtained from patients or parents before the experiments start and should be mentioned in this section. For human and/or research, research ethics information, such as ethics approval identifiers and the name of Institutional Ethics Review Board or Institutional Review Board, should be indicated in this section.
  • Results. This section focuses on the results and findings of the experiments performed. After (statistical) analysis, all results, including tables and figures, must be neatly presented. If necessary, this section can be sub-divided into multiple topical sub-sections.
  • Discussion. This section should provide the significance of the results and identify the impact of the research in a broader context. It should not be redundant or similar to the content of the results section.
  • Conclusion. Use this section for interpretation only, and not to summarize information already presented in the text or abstract.

It is acceptable to merge both Results and Discussion as a single section.

 

Unit of measurements

Use SI units.

 

Data and image processing

Post-acquisition processing of images, photos and figures should be kept minimum to ensure that the final figures accurately reflect the original data as it was captured and/or produced. Any alterations should be applied to the entire image. Any kind of alteration, including but not limited to brightness, contrast and color balance, has to be clearly stated in the figure legend and in Materials and Methods section. For simulated or model figures, the software used for production, editing, and/or processing should be mentioned. Presenting images in the same figure must be made apparent and should be explicitly indicated in the appropriate figure legends.

Data comparisons should only be made from comparative experiments (or data from the same experiment). Same piece of data or figure should not be used in multiple instances, unless the images/data describe different aspects of the same experiment (reasons must be stated, wherever appropriate, in this regard). If inappropriate image/data manipulation is identified after publication, the editors reserve the right to ask for the original data and, if that is not satisfactory, to issue a correction or retract the paper, as appropriate.

 

Chemical compounds

International Journal of Bioprinting requires authors to fulfill the requirements below while reporting and/or describing a chemical compound in articles:

Scenario

Requirements

Naming chemical compounds

Use either IUPAC conventions or common names such as cholesterol and cephalosporins

Reporting a new chemical compound

Provide the exact structure of the compound as well as sufficient data regarding the purity and identity of the compound

Reporting the use of a known chemical compound

Provide sufficient data regarding the source, purity and identity of the compound

 

Figures

Include all figures, including photographs, scanned images, graphs, charts and schematic diagrams, at the back of manuscript. Avoid unnecessary decorative effects (e.g., 3D graphs) and minimize image processing (e.g., changes in brightness and contrast applied uniformly for the entire figure should be avoided or minimized). All images should be set against white background.

All figures should be numbered (e.g., Figure 1Figure 2) in boldface. Label all figures (e.g., axis, structures), and add caption (a brief title) and legend as a description of the illustration below each figure. Explain all symbols and abbreviations used. Each figure should have a brief title (also known as caption) that describes the entire figure without citing specific panels, followed by a legend, which is either the description of each panel or further description about the single image. Identify each panel with uppercase letters in parenthesis (e.g. (A), (B), (C), etc.) Figures must be cited in chronological manner in the text.

The preferred file formats for any separately submitted figure(s) are JPEG, PNG and TIFF. All figures should be of optimal resolution. Optimal resolutions preferred are 300 dots per inch (dpi) for RBG colored, 600 dpi for grayscale and 1,200 dpi for line art. Although there is no file-size limitation imposed, authors are highly encouraged to compress their figures to an ideal size without unduly affecting the legibility and resolution of figures.

If necessary, the editors may request author(s) to supply high-resolution and/or unprocessed images after submission or paper acceptance for pre-screening/review and production purposes, respectively.

 

Tables

Include all tables at the back of manuscript. Editable tables created using Microsoft Word are preferred. A table should be accompanied by a caption on top of it. Captions and legends should be concise. All tables should be numbered (e.g., Table 1Table 2) in boldface. Explain all symbols and abbreviations used. Tables must be cited in chronological manner in the text.

 

Lists and math formulae

Lists and math formulae should be properly aligned and included within the main body of the manuscript. List them using Roman numerals in parenthesis (e.g. (I), (II), (III), (IV), etc.) Lists and math formulae must be cited in chronological manner in the text.

Lists and math formulae should be given in editable text and not as images. Use the solidus (/) for small fractional terms, e.g., X/Y. In principle, variables should be italicized.

 

Footnotes

Do not use footnotes.

 

In-text citations

Reference citations in the text should be numbered consecutively in superscript square brackets. Some examples:

  • Negotiation research spans many disciplines[3,4].
  • This result was later contradicted by Becker and Seligman[5].
  • This effect has been widely studied[1–3,7].

Do not include citations in the Abstract.

Personal communications and unpublished works can only be used in the manuscript and are not to be placed in the References section. Authors are advised to limit such usage to the minimum. These should be made identifiable by stating the authors, year of personal communications or unpublished works, and the words “personal communication” or “unpublished” in parenthesis, e.g., (Smith J, 2000, unpublished).

 

References

This section is compulsory and should be placed at the end of all manuscripts. Do not use footnotes or endnotes as a substitute for a reference list. The list of references should only include works that are cited in the text and that have been published or accepted for publication. Personal communications and unpublished works should be excluded from this section.

Authors being referenced are listed with their surname or last name followed by their initials. All references should be numbered (e.g. 1, 2, 3, and so on) and sequenced according to the order they appear as the in-text citations. References (especially journal article’s) should follow the general pattern: author(s), followed by year of publication, title of publication, abbreviated journal name in italics, volume number, issue number in parenthesis and lastly, page range or article ID. If the referred article has more than 3 authors, list only the first 3 authors and abbreviate the remaining authors as italicized “et al.” (meaning "and others"). Use of DOI is highly encouraged; include DOI, if available, after the page range or article ID. Examples of references for different types of publications are as follows:

 

(1) Journals

Journal article (print) with 1-3 authors:

Younger P, 2004, Using the internet to conduct a literature search. Nurs Stand, 19(6): 45–51.

Journal article (print) with more than 3 authors:

Gamelin FX, Baquet G, Berthoin S, et al., 2009, Effect of high intensity intermittent training on heart rate variability in prepubescent children. Eur J Appl Physiol, 105(1): 731–738.

Journal article (online) with 1-3 authors:

Jackson D, Firtko A, Edenborough M, 2007, Personal resilience as a strategy for surviving and thriving in the face of workplace adversity: A literature review. J Adv Nurs, 60(1): 1–9. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04412.x

Journal article (online) with more than 3 authors:

Hargreave M, Jensen A, Nielsen TSS, et al., 2015, Maternal use of fertility drugs and risk of cancer in children — A nationwide population-based cohort study in Denmark. Int J Cancer, 136(8): 1931–1939. http://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29235

 

(2) Books

Book with 1-3 authors:

Schneider Z, Whitehead D, Elliott D, 2007, Nursing and Midwifery Research: Methods and Appraisal for Evidence-based Practice, 3rd edn, Elsevier Australia, Marrickville, NSW, 112–130.

Book with more than 3 authors

Davis M, Charles L, Curry MJ, et al., 2003, Challenging Spatial Norms, Routledge, London, 12–30.

Chapter or article in book

Knowles MS, (eds) 1986, Independent study, in Using Learning Contracts, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 89–96.

 

(3) Preprints

Preprint article with 1-3 authors:

Ulgen A, Gurkut O, Li W, 2019, Potential Predictive Factors for Breast Cancer Subtypes from a North Cyprus Cohort Analysis. medRxiv. https://doi.org/10.1101/19010181

Preprint article with more than 3 authors:

Wu S, Sun P, Li R, et al., 2020, Epidemiological Development of Novel Coronavirus Pneumonia in China and Its Forecast. medRxiv. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.02.21.20026229

 

(4) Others

Proceedings of meetings and symposiums, conference papers:

Chang SS, Liaw L, Ruppenhofer J, (eds) 2000, Proceedings of the twenty-fifth annual meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, February 12–15, 1999: General session and parasession on loan word phenomena. Berkeley Linguistics Society, Berkeley, 12–13.

Conference proceedings (from electronic database):

Wang T, Cook C, Derby B, 2009, Fabrication of a glucose biosensor by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Sensor Technologies and Applications, 2009 (SENSORCOM-M’09), 82–85.

Online document with author names:

Este J, Warren C, Connor L, et al., 2008, Life in the clickstream: The future of journalism, Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, viewed May 27, 2009, http://www.alliance.org.au/documents/ foj_report_final.pdf

Online document without author name:

Developing an argument, n.d., viewed March 30, 2009, http://web.princeton.edu/sites/writing/Writing_Center/WCWritingResources.htm

Thesis/Dissertation:

Gale L, 2000, The relationship between leadership and employee empowerment for successful total quality management, thesis, Australasian Digital Thesis database, University of Western Sydney, 110–130.

Standards:

Standards Australia Online, 2006Glass in buildings: selection and installation, AS 1288-2006, amended January 31, 2008, SAI Global database, viewed May 19, 2009.

Government report:

National Commission of Audit, 1996, Report to the Commonwealth Government, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.

Government report (online):

Department of Health and Ageing, 2008, Ageing and aged care in Australia, viewed November 10, 2008, http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/ageing

No author:

Guide to agricultural meteorological practices, 1981, 2nd ed, Secretariat of the World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, 10–20.

 

Note: When referencing an entry from a dictionary or an encyclopedia with no author there is no requirement to include the source in the reference list. In these cases, only cite the title and year of the source in-text. For an authored dictionary/encyclopedia, treat the source as an authored book.

 

Acknowledgments*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

This is an optional section where authors can acknowledge people and/or institutions that provided non-financial support and/or helped with the research and/or preparation of the manuscript. Examples of non-financial support include externally-supplied equipment/biological sources, writing assistance, administrative support, and contributions from non-authors.

 

Funding*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

Authors should declare all financial support and sources that were used to perform the research, analysis, and/or article publication. Financial supports are generally in the form of grants, royalties, consulting fees and others.

 

Conflict of interest*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

At the time of submission, authors must declare any (potential) conflicts or competing interests with any institutes, organizations or agencies that might influence the integrity of results or objective interpretation of their submitted works. For more information, see our Conflict of Interest policy.

 

Author contributions*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

This section should be included in original research articles, short communications, and review articles. In International Journal of Bioprinting, we encourage authors to use Contributor Roles Taxonomy (CRediT) [hyperlink: https://casrai.org/credit/] in describing each contributor’s specific contribution to the scholarly output in the Author Contributions section.

Definitions of each contributor role as per CRediT are as follows:

Contributor role

Definition

Conceptualization

Ideas; formulation or evolution of overarching research goals and aims.

Data curation

Management activities to annotate (produce metadata), scrub data and maintain research data (including software code, where it is necessary for interpreting the data itself) for initial use and later re-use.

Formal analysis

Application of statistical, mathematical, computational, or other formal techniques to analyze or synthesize study data.

Funding acquisition

Acquisition of the financial support for the project leading to this publication.

Investigation

Conducting a research and investigation process, specifically performing the experiments, or data/evidence collection.

Methodology

Development or design of methodology; creation of models.

Project administration

Management and coordination responsibility for the research activity planning and execution.

Resources

Provision of study materials, reagents, materials, patients, laboratory samples, animals, instrumentation, computing resources, or other analysis tools.

Software

Programming, software development; designing computer programs; implementation of the computer code and supporting algorithms; testing of existing code components.

Supervision

Oversight and leadership responsibility for the research activity planning and execution, including mentorship external to the core team.

Validation

Verification, whether as a part of the activity or separate, of the overall replication/reproducibility of results/experiments and other research outputs.

Visualization

Preparation, creation and/or presentation of the published work, specifically visualization/data presentation.

Writing – original draft

Preparation, creation and/or presentation of the published work, specifically writing the initial draft (including substantive translation).

Writing – review & editing

Preparation, creation and/or presentation of the published work by those from the original research group, specifically critical review, commentary or revision – including pre- or post-publication stages.

Below shows a sample Author Contributions section written based on the CRediT:

Conceptualization: Ali Jackson, Helen Meyer
Investigation: Ali Jackson, Tom Lewis-Hans, Han Xiang
Formal analysis: Han Xiang
Writing – original draft: Ali Jackson
Writing – review & editing: Helen Meyer, Joshua O’Brien

 

Ethics approval and consent to participate*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

If the paper describes a study that involves humans, animals and primary cell lines from human patients, provide a statement stipulating the name of research ethics committee or Institutional Review Board (IRB) that grants the approval to carry out said study, and include the research ethics approval number for reference. Be specific in detailing the aspects the committee or IRB permits or approves. If more than one ethics committee and/or IRB were involved, state all of their names and carefully detail the aspects each of them approve of for carry out the study.

If human subjects were involved, state what form of consent (e.g., written and/or verbal) and whether or not permission was obtained from each of the subjects to participate in the study. If consent taking was not performed when human subjects were involved, provide a justification herein.

If none of the above is pertinent, state “Not applicable”.

 

Consent for publication*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

If human subjects were involved, state what form of consent (e.g., written and/or verbal) and whether or not permission was obtained from each of the subjects to publish their data and/or images. Efforts must be made by the authors to at least mask or conceal any identifying information of the patients that appear in writing or within photograph. If consent taking was not performed when human subjects were involved, provide a justification herein.

If none of the above is pertinent, state “Not applicable”.

 

Availability of data*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

Describe how data for used in the study can be obtained.

If none of the above is pertinent, state “Not applicable”.

 

Further disclosure*

*This should be included in the title page and back matter file

This section is reserved to inform the readers and editors of a few aspects:

(i) Part of or the entire set of findings have been presented in a conference, academic meeting, congress, etc.; and/or

(ii) The paper has been uploaded to or deposited in a preprint server (provide name of preprint server and associated accession number or DOI of the preprint.

 

Supplementary files

This section is optional and contains all materials and figures that are excluded from the manuscript. These materials, figures or additional information are relevant to the manuscript but remain non-essential to readers’ understanding of the manuscript’s main content. All supplementary information should be submitted as a separate file during submission.

Supplementary figures and tables should be submitted in a single, separate supplementary file, and must be numbered, for example, Figure S1 and Table S1. All tables must be editable (preferably created from Microsoft Word). The acceptable formats of images and illustrations used in figures are JPEG, PNG and TIFF. Citations of these items must be appropriately referenced in the manuscript in chronological manner, for instance, “Additional information can be found in Table S1.” Note the additional letter S helps distinguish the normal from supplementary items.

Data set file are usually prepared using Microsoft Excel (in XLS or XLSX format).

Videos (MP4 format), with a constituent maximum size of 15 MB, can be uploaded as part of the supplementary file.

 

Revision and response/rebuttal letter

If the editorial decision for a submission is major revision or minor revision, authors are advised to revise the manuscript (and possibly, the supplementary files) as per the review reports and resubmit the revision file, including the manuscript, title page and back matter, cover letter, and response/rebuttal letter, before the due date.

Revisions should be done on the latest version of the manuscript (or in some rare cases, edited manuscript provided by the editor) with the track change on. The revisions made should be described and/or clarified in the response/rebuttal letter; ideally, explanation about the revisions should be made clear with the help of page number and line number. If authors do not agree with reviewers’ comments and suggestions, rebut their points with strong evidence and reasonable arguments.

 

Copyright Notice

Copyright

The authors shall retain the copyright of their work but allow the Publisher to publish, copy, distribute, and convey the work.

 

License

International Journal of Bioprinting publishes accepted manuscripts under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC BY 4.0). Authors who submit their papers for publication by International Journal of Bioprinting agree to have the CC BY 4.0 license applied to their work, and that anyone is allowed to reuse the article or part of it free of charge for any purpose, including commercial use, as long as the author and original source is properly cited, anyone may copy, redistribute, reuse and transform the content.

For more information, refer to the journal’s Copyright and License section.

 

Privacy Statement

The names and other email addresses entered on the journal website will be used for the intended purpose of this publication and will not be provided to other parties for any purpose.

 

Focus and Scope

International Journal of Bioprinting is an international journal covering the technology, science and clinical application of the broadly defined field of Bioprinting. Bioprinting is defined as the use of 3D printing technology with materials that incorporate viable living cells or biological elements to produce tissue or biotechnological products.

We are interested in the scientific topics spanning all stages of bioprinting process from concept creation to fabrication and beyond. Knowledge generated in these researches must be related to bioprinting.

The journal publishes original research articles on basic and applied research as well as associated social implications of this research. The journal also publishes brief commentaries and reviews. Articles focusing on the practical applications of 3D-printed products are similarly welcome.

Examples of relevant topics include but are not limited to:

Information technologies and basic research

  • Medical scanning and imaging for printable format
  • Data security and validation in medical additive manufacturing
  • Logistic management in bioprinting
  • Mass customization design methodology or platform technology
  • Blueprint for organ printing
  • Automated algorithm for 3D modelling of bioprintable files
  • Research models (e.g. cancer, pre-surgical evaluation, etc.)

Materials and formulation

  • New material and method of preparation
  • Hybrid and composite material system
  • Evaluation technologies for bioprinting process and bioprinted product
  • Biomimetic and bioinspired design and material system
  • Interaction of processing and materials
  • Post-processing of bioprinted medical constructs

Cell source and biotechnology for additive manufacturing

  • Cell source research
  • Large-scale or high throughput cell culture techniques
  • Tissue spheroid research (modelling, analysis, measurement, biological observation, characterization)
  • Interaction of cell-material

3D Bioprinting technologies

  • Bioprinting technologies or 3D printing techniques for direct manipulation of cells and biological elements
  • New printing systems or new printing methodology
  • Optimization methodology 

New design and fabrication paradigm

  • Hybrid approach in medical additive manufacturing
  • Information technologies and software in
  • Architectural design
  • Real time and non-invasive monitoring techniques
  • Maturation techniques of printed construct
  • Bioreactor for printed construct

Applied research purpose & evaluation of 3D printed products

  • Implants and prosthetics
  • Bioprinting
  • Biological tissue model for toxicology testing, drug delivery, drug production-related
  • Scaffold for tissue engineering
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Medical imaging purposes (e.g. 3D-printed probes)
  • Bionic organ
  • Organ printing
  • Personalized drug
  • Biomodels for surgical training and planning
  • Exoskeleton
  • Further optimisation/advantages/limitations
  • Education

Associated social implications

  • Ethics
  • Economic relationships and shifts
  • Policies and regulation
  • Intellectual property (IP-copyright, design protection, patents, and trademarks), licensing
  • Business (e.g. chain supply, management)
  • Environmental impact
  • Community sentiments to 3D-printed products (e.g. healthcare providers, users, etc.)

 

Peer Review Process

Every International Journal of Bioprinting submission will be pre-screened by the editors to ensure its adherence to the scope, policies and style of the journal prior to peer review. Author(s) may suggest up to 4 academically qualified reviewers for consideration per submission. Authors should insert the current contact details, including full name, email address and affiliation, of the recommended reviewers, and state the reason(s) for recommendation in the cover letter. However, since the editorial team strives to ensure that the peer review process is fair and unbiased, there is no guarantee that a recommended reviewer will be approached to perform the peer review. In addition, author(s) may indicate the name of individuals that should not be invited as peer reviewer and provide the reasons in the cover letter.

Editor-in-Chief will decide on the submissions that should be considered for publication, and assign reviewers from inside the editorial board or outside, depending on the topic, to initiate double-blind peer review. Based on the review reports and reviewers’ recommendations, Editor-in-Chief makes one of the following editorial decisions: accept, minor revision, major revision, and reject.

If the decision made necessitates minor revisions to the paper, author(s) should spend no more than 7 days to prepare and submit the revision file containing revised manuscript, title page and back matter, cover letter, and response/rebuttal letter. If the decision made necessitates major revisions to the paper, author(s) should spend no more than 14 days to prepare and submit the revision file. The revision file will be once again pre-screened by editor and subsequently reviewed by the assigned reviewers.

The peer review process is considered complete for a submission once it has been accepted for publication in International Journal of Bioprinting. Only accepted papers will be arranged for copy-editing, typesetting and proofreading before online publication.

 

Publication Frequency

Quarterly

 

Open Access Policy

This journal provides immediate open access to its content on the principle of making research freely available to the public in support of a greater global exchange of knowledge.

 
Online Submissions

Announcements

 

Declaration

 
Recently, we have been in receipt of a few complaints from readers about a Call for Paper email sent out from IJB-h@whioce.com. Please note that this is NOT a work email address of any of our colleagues at Whioce Publishing. If you receive an email from this email ID, please do not hesitate to report it via an email to felicia_wang@whioce.com. Any clues from you would help with our investigations in this matter. The official email ID of International Journal of Bioprinting in-house editor is editor@whioce.com  
Posted: 2022-05-31
 

Special Issue: Additive Manufacturing of Functional Biomaterials--Call for Papers

 

Dear Colleagues

Additive manufacturing (AM) of biomaterials has been developing rapidly in the last two decades. This is due to many benefits in both fabrication techniques, which give unique freedom in customization, and bio-based materials for developing green and sustainable products. Biomaterials currently have a wide range of applications in biomedical engineering, bioimplants, biosensors, packaging industry, etc. The application of functional biomaterials can provide a unique capability to fabricate active products that can transform from one state/shape to another. Therefore, this smart behavior can be applied in the design and manufacturing of products with intended functionalities.

We invite the submission of full-length papers of original research contributions, review papers, and communications that are of high quality, impact, and novelty as well as being interesting for wide audiences of scientific and technological communities. Potential topics for this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The latest developments in functional biomaterials for AM processes;
  • Novel 3D/4D printing techniques and technologies for the fabrication of high-quality biobased products;
  • Theoretical and experimental research, knowledge, and new ideas in design for functional bioproducts using AM technology;
  • Mathematical modeling or numerical simulation to predict/optimize the functionality of AMed biomaterials;

Development in characterization methods for AMed biomaterials


 
Posted: 2022-04-15 More...
 

Special Issue: 3D Bioprinting Hydrogels and Organ-On-Chip--Call for Papers

 

Dear Colleagues

This special issue is oriented to all types of design and characterization of 3D bioprinting and organ-on-chip platforms, with printed tissue models and/or miniaturized microfluidics, to approach biological and physiological parameters of the in vivo tissue counterparts. Special attention will be given but will not be limited to the development of biocompatible hydrogel polymer bio-inks and microsystems engineering setups to achieve relevant functional tissues, by having understanding on material science and technological applications.


 
Posted: 2022-04-07 More...
 
More Announcements...