International Journal of Bioprinting

Editor-in-Chief: Chee Kai Chua

ISSN: 2424-8002 (Online)

Publishing Frequency: Bi-annual

Article Processing Charges (APC): Click here for more details

Publishing Model: Open Access

Journal no: 10

About the Journal

International Journal of Bioprinting is a biannual, double-blind peer-reviewed, open access journal. This journal focuses on the use of 3D printing technology with materials that incorporate viable living cells or biological elements to produce tissue or biotechnological products. Further discourses and technological advancements in bioprinting are the goals behind acceptance of high-quality basic and applied research: from concept creation to fabrication of the bioprinting process, associated clinical applications as well as social implications.

For a detailed look at IJB's scope, please click here.

Recently Published Articles


Chee Kai Chua
142 Views, 41 PDF Downloads

Original Articles

Yannapol Sriphutkiat, Surasak Kasetsirikul, Yufeng Zhou
190 Views, 68 PDF Downloads
3D bioprinting becomes one of the popular approaches in the tissue engineering. In this emerging application, bioink is crucial for fabrication and functionality of constructed tissue. The use of cell spheroids as bioink can enhance the cell-cell interaction and subsequently the growth and differentiation of cells in the 3D printed construct with the minimal amount of other biomaterials. However, the conventional methods of preparing the cell spheroids have several limitations, such as long culture time, low-throughput, and medium modification. In this study, the formation of cell spheroids by SSAW was evaluated both numerically and experimentally in order to overcome the aforementioned limitations. The effects of excitation frequencies on the cell accumulation time, diameter of formed cell spheroids, and subsequently, the growth and viability of cell spheroids in the culture media over time were studied. Using the high-frequency (24.9 MHz) excitation, cell accumulation time to the pressure nodes could be reduced in comparison to that of the low-frequency (10.4 MHz) excitation, but in a smaller spheroid size. SSAW excitation at both frequencies does not affect the cell viabilities up to 7 days, > 90% with no statistical difference compared with the control group. In summary, SSAW can effectively prepare the cell spheroids as bioink for the future 3D bioprinting and various biotechnology applications (e.g., pharmaceutical drug screening and tissue engineering).

Review Articles

Fan Liu, Chen Liu, Qiuhong Chen, Qiang Ao, Xiaohong Tian, Jun Fan, Hao Tong, Xiaohong Wang
349 Views, 201 PDF Downloads

Three dimensional (3D) printing is a hot topic in today’s scientific research and commercial areas. It is recognized as the third revolution in industrial as well as biomedical fields. Recently, human organ 3D bioprinting has been put forward into equity market as a concept stock and attracted a lot of attention. A large number of outstanding scientists have flung themselves into this area and made some remarkable headways. Nevertheless, organ 3D bioprinting is a sophisticated procedure which needs profound scientific/technological backgrounds/knowledges to accomplish Especially, large organ 3D bioprinting encounters enormous difficulties and challenges. One of them is to build implantable branched vascular networks in a predefined 3D construct. At present, organ 3D bioprinting still in its infancy and a great deal of work needs to be done. Here we briefly overview some of the achievements of 3D bioprinting in three large organs, such as the bone, liver and heart.


Original Articles

Hongtao Liang, Jiankang He, Jinke Chang, Bing Zhang, Dichen Li
447 Views, 138 PDF Downloads

Cell printing has found wide applications in biomedical fields due to its unique capability in fabricating living tissue constructs with precise control over cell arrangements. However, it is still challenging to print cell-laden 3D structures simultaneously with high resolution and high cell viability. Here a coaxial nozzle-assisted electrohydrodynamic cell printing strategy was developed to fabricate living 3D cell-laden constructs. Critical process parameters such as feeding rate and stage moving speed were evaluated to achieve smaller hydrogel filaments. The effect of CaCl2 feeding rate on the printing of 3D alginate hydrogel constructs was also investigated. The results indicated that the presented strategy can print 3D hydrogel structures with relatively uniform filament dimension (about 80 μm) and cell distribution. The viability of the encapsulated cells was over 90%. We envision that the coaxial nozzle-assisted electrohydrodynamic printing will become a promising cell printing strategy to advance biomedical innovations.


Review Articles

Tae-Sik Jang, Hyun-Do Jung, Houwen Matthew Pan, Win Tun Han, Shenyang Chen, Juha Song
495 Views, 210 PDF Downloads

Three-dimensional (3D) printing of hydrogels is now an attractive area of research due to its capability to fabricate intricate, complex and highly customizable scaffold structures that can support cell adhesion and promote cell infiltration for tissue engineering. However, pure hydrogels alone lack the necessary mechanical stability and are too easily degraded to be used as printing ink. To overcome this problem, significant progress has been made in the 3D printing of hydrogel composites with improved mechanical performance and biofunctionality. Herein, we provide a brief overview of existing hydrogel composite 3D printing techniques including laser based-3D printing, nozzle based-3D printing, and inkjet printer based-3D printing systems. Based on the type of additives, we will discuss four main hydrogel composite systems in this review: polymer- or hydrogel-hydrogel composites, particle-reinforced hydrogel composites, fiber-reinforced hydrogel composites, and anisotropic filler-reinforced hydrogel composites. Additionally, several emerging potential applications of hydrogel composites in the field of tissue engineering and their accompanying challenges are discussed in parallel.


Original Articles

Mehri Behbehani, Adam Glen, Caroline S. Taylor, Alexander Schuhmacher, Frederik Claeyssens, John W. Haycock
276 Views, 103 PDF Downloads

Autografts are the current gold standard for large peripheral nerve defects in clinics despite the frequently occurring side effects like donor site morbidity. Hollow nerve guidance conduits (NGC) are proposed alternatives to autografts, but fail to bridge gaps exceeding 3 cm in humans. Internal NGC guidance cues like microfibres are believed to enhance hollow NGCs by giving additional physical support for directed regeneration of Schwann cells and axons. In this study, we report a new 3D in vitro model that allows the evaluation of different intraluminal fibre scaffolds inside a complete NGC. The performance of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) microfibres inside 5 mm long polyethylene glycol (PEG) conduits was investigated in neuronal cell and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures in vitro. Z-stack confocal microscopy revealed the aligned orientation of neuronal cells along the fibres throughout the whole NGC length and depth. The number of living cells in the centre of the scaffold was not significantly different to the tissue culture plastic (TCP) control. For ex vivo analysis, DRGs were placed on top of fibre-filled NGCs to simulate the proximal nerve stump. In 21 days of culture, Schwann cells and axons infiltrated the conduits along the microfibres with 2.2 ± 0.37 mm and 2.1 ± 0.33 mm respectively. We conclude that this in vitro model can help define internal NGC scaffolds in the future by comparing different fibre materials, composites and dimensions in one setup prior to animal testing.

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Archiving and Indexing Road Map

International Journal of Bioprinting (IJB) aims to be indexed by world-recognized databases, for example, PubMed, Scopus and Science Citation Index (SCI). IJB has been indexed by several world class abstracting/indexing databases:

Editorial Board


Chee Kai ChuaNanyang Technological UniversitySingapore

Associate Editors

Wai Yee YeongNanyang Technological UniversitySingapore

Editorial Board Members

Aleksandr OvsianikovVienna University of TechnologyAustria
Ali KhademhosseiniHarvard UniversityUnited Kingdom
Boris N. ChichkovLeibniz University of HanoverGermany
Charlotte HauserKing Abdullah University of Science & TechnologySaudi Arabia
Cijun ShuaiCentral South UniversityChina
Dong Jin YooDaejin UniversitySouth Korea
Frederik ClaeyssensUniversity of SheffieldUnited Kingdom
Geun Hyung KimSungkyunkwan UniversitySouth Korea
Giovanni VozziUniversity of PisaItaly
Ibrahim Tarik OzbolatPenn State UniversityUnited States
Jiankang HeXi'an Jiaotong UniversityChina
Lay Poh TanNanyang Technological UniversitySingapore
Makoto NakamuraUniversity of ToyamaJapan
Martin BirchallUniversity College LondonUnited Kingdom
Paulo Jorge Da Silva BartoloUniversity of ManchesterUnited Kingdom
Peter DubruelGhent UniversityBelgium
Richard BibbLoughborough UniversityUnited Kingdom
Roger NarayanNorth Carolina State UniversityUnited States
Savas TasogluUniversity of ConnecticutUnited States
Shoufeng YangKatholieke Universiteit Leuven (KU Leuven)Belgium
Tal DvirTel Aviv UniversityIsrael
Vladimir MironovCenter for Information Technology Renato ArcherBrazil
Xiaohong WangTsinghua UniversityChina

Assistant Editor

Jia AnNanyang Technological UniversitySingapore

Focus and Scope

International Journal of Bioprinting is an international journal covering the technology, science and clinical application of the broadly defined field of Bioprinting. Bioprinting is defined as the use of 3D printing technology with materials that incorporate viable living cells or biological elements to produce tissue or biotechnological products.

We are interested in the scientific topics spanning all stages of bioprinting process from concept creation to fabrication and beyond. Knowledge generated in these researches must be related to bioprinting.

The journal publishes original research articles on basic and applied research as well as associated social implications of this research. The journal also publishes brief commentaries and reviews. Articles focusing on the practical applications of 3D-printed products are similarly welcome.

Examples of relevant topics included but are not limited to:

Information technologies and basic research

  • Medical scanning and imaging for printable format
  • Data security and validation in medical additive manufacturing
  • Logistic management in bioprinting
  • Mass customization design methodology or platform technology
  • Blueprint for organ printing
  • Automated algorithm for 3D modelling of bioprintable files
  • Research models (e.g. cancer, pre-surgical evaluation, etc.)

Materials and formulation

  • New material and method of preparation
  • Hybrid and composite material system
  • Evaluation technologies for bioprinting process and bioprinted product
  • Biomimetic and bioinspired design and material system
  • Interaction of processing and materials
  • Post-processing of bioprinted medical constructs

Cell source and biotechnology for additive manufacturing

  • Cell source research
  • Large-scale or high throughput cell culture techniques
  • Tissue spheroid research ( modelling, analysis, measurement, biological observation, characterization)
  • Interaction of cell-material

3D Bioprinting technologies

  • Bioprinting technologies or 3D printing techniques for direct manipulation of cells and biological elements
  • New printing systems or new printing methodology
  • Optimization methodology 

New design and fabrication paradigm

  • Hybrid approach in medical additive manufacturing
  • Information technologies and software in
  • Architectural design
  • Real time and non-invasive monitoring techniques
  • Maturation techniques of printed construct
  • Bioreactor for printed construct

Applied research purpose & evaluation of 3D printed products

  • Implants and prosthetics
  • Bioprinting
  • Biological tissue model for toxicology testing, drug delivery, drug production-related
  • Scaffold for tissue engineering
  • Regenerative medicine
  • Medical imaging purposes(e.g. 3D-printed probes)
  • Bionic organ
  • Organ printing
  • Personalized drug
  • Biomodels for surgical training and planning
  • Exoskeleton
  • Further optimisation/advantages/limitations
  • Education

Associated social implications

  • Ethics
  • Economic relationships and shifts
  • Policies and regulation
  • Intellectual property (IP-copyright, design protection, patents, and trademarks), licensing
  • Business (e.g. chain supply, management)
  • Environmental impact
  • Community sentiments to 3D-printed products (e.g. healthcare providers, users, etc.)

For Authors

  • A manuscript would not be accepted if it has been published or is currently under consideration for publication in any other journals. The author will need to notify the editorial team if the data in their submission has been presented in conferences. After acceptance, the Publisher will have the right to edit the work for the original edition and for any revision.

  • Authorship should be limited to people who have contributed substantially to the work. Authors must indicate their specific contributions to the published work. This information should be listed in the manuscript under the section ‘Author Contribution’. Examples of contributions include: designed research, performed research, contributed new reagents or analytic tools, analyzed data, wrote the paper.

    For more information on submission’s format, please refer to the ‘Author Guidelines’ link accessible from the ‘About’ button at the top row of this page.

    The corresponding author should be clearly indicated for all manuscripts submitted. A maximum of two corresponding authors are allowed for the responsibilities associated. The corresponding author(s) is responsible for:

    • Obtaining permission from all the authors mentioned in the manuscript
    • Ensuring adherence to all editorial and submission policies and for any communications and actions that may be necessary after publication
    • Including written permission from the authors of the work concerned for any mention of any unpublished material included in the manuscript, e.g. data from manuscripts-in-press, personal communication, or work in preparation. 
  • The author has to provide the authorization of no conflict with any financial body or funding agency that might influence the results or interpretation of their manuscript. All authors, members, reviewers and editors must disclose any association that poses a conflict of interest in connection with the manuscript. The corresponding author will be asked to sign a form behalf of all of the authors regarding potential conflicts of interest at the time of acceptance.
  • The editorial team does not approve of any plagiarism attempts. iThenticate will be utilized at the editor’s discretion to verify the originality of submitted manuscripts. If plagiarism is detected during the review process the manuscript may be rejected pending the severity of plagiarism. Therefore, if a manuscript uses a text copied directly from another source, this text must be written in quotation marks and the original source must be cited.
  • All articles must be written in English — preferably American English. SI units should be used. If you are not a native English speaker, you may want to utilize an external or Whioce Publishing’s optional professional language editing service before submitting the final version.

    Whioce Publishing Pte Ltd offers its own professional editing services. By using this service, you can be sure that your English-language manuscript will be polished and ready for submission to your publication of choice at a very reasonable price. For further details about the Language Editing Services, please contact us at Please note that utilizing a language editing service is not a guarantee of acceptance.

  • All advertisements are subject to approval to the Publisher. Advertisements must comply with the relevant regulations in the country where the advertisements appears. For more inquiries, please send email to
  • Authors are expected to have minimum amount of post-acquisition processing of data. In case of processing; alterations must be applied to the entire image (e.g., brightness, contrast, color balance). Any kind of alteration if being done has to be clearly stated in the figure legend and in Methods section.

    Grouping of data (e.g., cropping of images of removal of lanes from gels and bolts) must be made apparent and should be explicitly indicated in the appropriate figure legends. Data comparisons should only be made from comparative experiments, and individual data should not be utilized across multiple figures. If inappropriate image/data manipulation is identified after publication, we reserve the right to ask for the original data and, if that is not satisfactory, to issue a correction or retract the paper, as appropriate.

  • Before submitting for publication, please check that your manuscript has been prepared in accordance to the step-by-step instructions for submitting a manuscript to our online submission system.

    Manuscript Format

    Your manuscript should be in MS Word or LaTeX format. You are advised to download the template when preparing your submissions to this journal. All manuscripts must be written in clear, comprehensible English. Both British and American English are accepted. Usage of non-English words should be kept to a minimum and all must be italicized, with the exception of “e.g.” and “i.e.” If you have concerns about the level of English in your submission, please ensure that it is proofread before submission by a native English speaker or a scientific editing service.

    Types of submission accepted:

    International Journal of Bioprinting accepts original articles, reviews, letters, editorials, commentaries, perspectives and position papers. Please read this section further for the definition of each type and select the appropriate option in the submission system. Submissions exceeding the suggested requirements, such as total manuscript length, will still be processed for consideration and peer review. However, article processing charges will differ in exceptional cases (e.g. a raw text file exceeding 2MB, etc.) The article processing charge will then be determined on a case-by-case basis.

    Original articles: Scientific articles on original basic and applied research and/or analysis. This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figures in total, and has approximately 40 references and 7,000 words (inclusive of reference list and abstract).

    Review articles: A summary highlighting recent developments and current/future trends of the field. This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figures in total, with approximately 70 references and 7,000 words (inclusive of reference list and abstract).

    Letters to the Editor-in-Chief/authorship (please specify): Comments from reader(s) about individual articles. These letters must be constructive and contribute to the development of individual articles published or the entire journal. Letters containing new ideas, supporting data or data criticizing an article may be subjected to peer-review (determined on a case-by-case basis by the journal’s editorial team) and published in the online publication but not in the printed version. This manuscript type typically has 1,800 words (exclusive of reference list).

    Editorials: Solicited concise commentary highlighting prominent topics in the Journal’s issue. These are the official opinions of the editors of the journal or its special issue. Editorials will be published in both online and printed versions of the journal. This manuscript type typically has 3,500 words.

    Commentaries: Unsolicited commentaries or analysis from reader(s) targeting specific published articles in the journal. Commentaries will be subjected to peer-review and may be published in both online and printed versions of the journal. This manuscript type typically has 3,500 words.

    Perspectives: These are author’s personal opinion on a subject/topic. Unlike Reviews, Perspective articles may cover a more specific, narrow part of the field. However, these are still required to uphold the spirit of academia of being objective as well as aiming to initiate or furthering discussions and novel experimental procedures in the field. Therefore, it will undergo peer review and be indexed if accepted. Accepted articles may be solicited or unsolicited. This manuscript type typically has 5 tables and figures in total, along with approximately 70 references and 7,000 words (inclusive of reference list and abstract).

    Reports: Documents that summarize the execution and results of a clinical case involving bioprinted construct or a collaborative research programme that is directly related to the advancement of bioprinting. Submissions will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and are usually solicited by the editors.

    Position papers: Submissions that reflect the official opinion of an organization (e.g. government bodies, funding agencies, etc.) This manuscript type typically has 3,500 words.

    Cover letter

    All submissions should include a cover letter as a separate file. A cover letter should contain a brief explanation of what was previously known, the conceptual advancement with the findings and its significance to broad readership. The cover letter is confidential and will be read only by the editors. It will not be seen by reviewers.


    The title should capture the conceptual significance for a broad audience. The title should not be more than 50 words and should be able to give readers an overall view of the paper’s significance. Titles should avoid using uncommon jargons, abbreviations and punctuation.

    List of Authors

    The names of authors must be spelled out rather than set in initials along with their affiliations. Authors should be listed according to the extent of their contribution, with the major contributor listed first. All corresponding authors should be identified with an asterisk. Affiliations should contain the following core information: department, institution, city, state, postal code, and country. For contact, email address of at least one corresponding author must be included. Please note that all authors must view and approve the final version of the manuscript before submitting.


    Articles must include an abstract containing a maximum of 200 words. The purpose of abstract is to provide sufficient information for a reader to determine whether or not to proceed to the full text of the article. After the abstract, please give 5 keywords; please avoid using the same words as those already used in the title, separate terms with a semi-colon (term1; term2; term3).

    Section Headings

    Please number the section headings (e.g. 1, 2, 3, 4, etc.) in boldface. Likewise, use boldface to identify subheadings too but please distinguish it from major headings using numbers (e.g. 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, etc.) Further subsections of subheadings should be differentiated by boldface and italics font with the numbers (1), (2), (3), etc.


    The introduction should provide a background that gives a broad readership an overall outlook of the field and the research performed. It tackles a problem and states its important regarding with the significance of the study. Introduction can conclude with a brief statement of the aim of the work and a comment about whether that aim was achieved.

    Materials and Methods

    This section provides the general experimental design and methodologies used. The aim is to provide enough detail to for other investigators to fully replicate the results. It is also required to facilitate better understanding of the results obtained. Protocols and procedures for new methods must be included in detail for the reproducibility of the experiments. Informed consent should be obtained from patients or parents before the experiments start and should be mentioned in this section.


    Ethics information include IACUC permit numbers and/or IRB name, if applicable. This information should be included in a subheading labelled "Ethics Statement" in the "Methods" section of the manuscript file, in as much detail as possible.


    This section can be divided into subheadings and focuses on the results of the experiments performed.


    This section should provide the significance of the results and identify the impact of the research in a broader context. It should not be redundant or similar to the content of the results section.


    Please use the conclusion section for interpretation only, and not to summarize information already presented in the text or abstract.

    Conflict of Interest

    All authors are required to declare all activities that have the potential to be deemed as a source of competing interest in relations to their submitted manuscript. Examples of such activities could include personal or work-related relationships, events, etc. Authors who have nothing to declare are encouraged to add "No conflict of interest was reported by all authors" in this section.


    Authors should declare all financial and non-financial support that have the potential to be deemed as a source of competing interest in relations to their submitted manuscript in this section. Financial supports are generally in the form of grants, royalties, consulting fees and others. Examples of non-financial support could include the following: externally-supplied equipment/biological sources, writing assistance, administrative support, contributions from non-authors, etc.


    This section is optional and is for all materials (e.g. advanced technical details) that has been excluded from the main text but remain essential to the readers in understanding the manuscripts. This section is not for supplementary figures. Authors are advised to refer to the section on Supplementary Figures for such submissions.


    The text of the manuscript should be in Microsoft Word or Latex. The length of the manuscript cannot be more than 50,000 characters (inclusive of spaces), or approximately 7,000 words.

    Nomenclature for genes and proteins

    This journal aims to reach researchers all over the globe. Hence, for reviewers’ and readers’ ease in comprehension, authors are highly encouraged to use the appropriate gene and protein nomenclature. Authors may prefer to utilize resources such as


    Authors should include all figures into the manuscript and submit it as one file. Figures include photographs, scanned images, graphs, charts and schematic diagrams. Figures submitted should avoid unnecessary decorative effects (e.g. 3D graphs), as well as should be minimally processed (e.g. changes in brightness and contrast applied uniformly for the entire figure). It should also be set against a white background. Please remember to label all figures (e.g. axis, etc.) and add captions below the figure, as required. These captions should be numbered (e.g. Figure 1, Figure 2, etc.) in boldface. All figures must have a brief title (also known as caption) that describes the entire figure without citing specific panels, followed by a legend, defined as description of each panel. Please identify each panel with uppercase letters in parenthesis (e.g. (A), (B), (C), etc.)

    The preferred file formats for any separately submitted figure(s) are TIFF or JPEG. All figures should be legible in print form and of optimal resolution. Optimal resolutions preferred are 300 dots per inch (dpi) for RBG coloured, 600 dpi for greyscale and 1,200 dpi for line art. Although there are no file-size limitation imposed, authors are highly encouraged to compress their figures to an ideal size without unduly affecting the legibility and resolution of figures. This will also speed up the process of uploading in the submission system, if necessary.

    The Editor-in-Chief and Publisher reserve the right to request from author(s) the high-resolution files and unprocessed data and metadata files, should the need arise at any point after manuscript submission for reasons such as production, evaluation or other purposes. The file name should allow for ease in identifying the associated manuscript submitted.

    Tables, lists and equations

    Tables created using Microsoft Word table function are preferred. The tables should include a title at the top. Titles and footnotes/legends should be concise. These must be submitted in the manuscript. Likewise, lists and equations should be properly aligned and its meaning clear to readers. For listing items within the main body of the manuscript, please use Roman numbers in parenthesis (e.g. (i), (ii), (iii), (iv), etc.).

    Supplementary information

    This section is optional and contains all materials and figures that have been excluded from the entire manuscript. These information are relevant to the manuscript but remain non-essential to readers’ understanding of the manuscript’s main content. All supplementary information should be submitted as a separate file in Step 4 during submission. Please ensure the names of such files contain ‘suppl. info’. Videos may be included in this section.

    In-text citations

    Reference citations in the text should be numbered consecutively in superscript square brackets. Some examples:

    1. Negotiation research spans many disciplines[3,4].
    2. This result was later contradicted by Becker and Seligman[5].
    3. This effect has been widely studied[1–3,7].

    Personal communications and unpublished works can only be used in the main text of the submission and are not to be placed in the Reference section. Authors are advised to limit such usage to the minimum. These should also be easily identifiable by stating the authors and year of such unpublished works or personal communications, and the word ‘Unpublished’ in parenthesis.

    E.g. (Smith J, 2000, Unpublished)


    This section is compulsory and should be placed at the end of all manuscripts. Do not use footnotes or endnotes as a substitute for a reference list. The list of references should only include works that are cited in the text and that have been published or accepted for publication. Personal communications and unpublished works should be excluded from this section. The EndNote output style of IJB can be downloaded at here.

    For the reference list, all authors must be stated. Authors being referenced are listed with their surname followed by their initials. All references should be numbered (e.g. 1, 2, 3, etc.) and sequenced according to the order they appear as the in-text citations. References should follow the following pattern: Author(s), followed by year of publication, title of publication, abbreviated journal name in italics, volume number, issue number in parenthesis and lastly, page range. If the referred article has more than three authors, list only the first three authors and abbreviate the remaining authors as the italicized ‘et al.’ (meaning "and others"). If the DOI is available, please include it after the page range. Examples of references for different types of publications are as follows;


    Journal article (print) with one to three authors:

    Younger P, 2004, Using the internet to conduct a literature search. Nurs Stand, 19(6): 45–51.

    Journal article (print) with more than three authors:

    Gamelin F X, Baquet G, Berthoin S, et al., 2009, Effect of high intensity intermittent training on heart rate variability in prepubescent children. Eur J Appl Physiol, 105(1): 731–738.

    Journal article (online) with one to three authors:

    Jackson D, Firtko A and Edenborough M, 2007, Personal resilience as a strategy for surviving and thriving in the face of workplace adversity: A literature review. J Adv Nurs, 60(1): 1–9.

    Journal article (online) with more than three authors:

    Hargreave M, Jensen A, Nielsen T S S, et al., 2015, Maternal use of fertility drugs and risk of cancer in children — A nationwide population-based cohort study in Denmark. Int J Cancer, 136(8): 1931–1939.


    Book with one to three authors:

    Schneider Z, Whitehead D and Elliott D, 2007, Nursing and Midwifery Research: Methods and Appraisal for Evidence-based Practice, 3rd edn, Elsevier Australia, Marrickville, NSW, 112–130.

    Book with more than three authors

    Davis M, Charles L, Curry M J, et al., 2003, Challenging Spatial Norms, Routledge, London, 12–30.

    Chapter or article in book

    Knowles M S, (eds) 1986, Independent study, in Using Learning Contracts, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 89–96.


    Proceedings of meetings and symposiums, conference papers:

    Chang S S, Liaw L and Ruppenhofer J, (eds) 2000, Proceedings of the twenty-fifth annual meeting of the Berkeley Linguistics Society, February 12–15, 1999: General session and parasession on loan word phenomena. Berkeley Linguistics Society, Berkeley, 12–13.

    Conference proceedings (from electronic database):

    Wang T, Cook C and Derby B, 2009, Fabrication of a glucose biosensor by piezoelectric inkjet printing. Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Sensor Technologies and Applications, 2009 (SENSORCOM-
    , 82–85.

    Online document with author names:

    Este J, Warren C, Connor L, et al., 2008, Life in the clickstream: The future of journalism, Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance, viewed May 27, 2009, foj_report_final.pdf

    Online document without author name:

    Developing an argument, n.d., viewed March 30, 2009,


    Gale L, 2000, The relationship between leadership and employee empowerment for successful total quality management, thesis, Australasian Digital Thesis database, University of Western Sydney, 110–130.


    Standards Australia Online, 2006, Glass in buildings: selection and installation, AS 1288-2006, amended January 31, 2008, SAI Global database, viewed May 19, 2009.

    Government report:

    National Commission of Audit, 1996, Report to the Commonwealth Government, Australian Government Publishing Service, Canberra.

    Government report (online):

    Department of Health and Ageing, 2008, Ageing and aged care in Australia, viewed November 10, 2008,

    No author:

    Guide to agricultural meteorological practices, 1981, 2nd edn, Secretariat of the World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, 10–20.

    Note: When referencing an entry from a dictionary or an encyclopedia with no author there is no requirement to include the source in the reference list. In these cases, only cite the title and year of the source in-text. For an authored dictionary/encyclopedia, treat the source as an authored book.

  • Authors contributing to International Journal of Bioprinting agree to publish their articles under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 International License, allowing third parties to share their work (copy, distribute, transmit) and to adapt it, under the condition that the authors are given credit, that the work is not used for commercial purposes, and that in the event of reuse or distribution, the terms of this license are made clear. Authors retain the copyright of their works in this journal.

  • The names and email addresses entered in this journal site will be used exclusively for the stated purposes of this journal and will not be made available for any other purpose or to any other party.

Article Processing Charges (APC)

International Journal of Bioprinting is an Open Access Journal under Whioce Publishing. All articles published in International Journal of Bioprinting are accessible electronically from the journal website without commencing any kind of payment. In order to ensure contents are freely available and maintain publishing quality, Article Process Charges (APC) is applicable to all authors who wish to submit their articles to the journal to cover the cost incurred in processing the manuscripts. Such cost will cover the peer-review, copyediting, typesetting, publishing, content depositing and archiving processes. Those charges are applicable only to authors who have their manuscript successfully accepted after peer-review.

Journal TitleAPC
International Journal of BioprintingUSD800

We encourage authors to publish their papers with us and don’t wish the cost of article processing fees to be a barrier especially to authors from the low and lower middle income countries/regions. A range of discounts or waivers are offered to authors who are unable to pay our publication processing fees. Authors can write in to apply for a waiver and requests will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Authors based in these countries/regions listed below may apply to receive up to a 50%-100% waiver of the standard article processing fee; Waiver subjected to approval.

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January 2018 issue is now published online


IJB has published its latest issue (Volume 4, Issue 1). View the full issue at HERE.

As of January 2018, the numbers of cites in 2017 of papers in 2015 and 2016 have reached 144. View the citation analysis report at HERE.

Posted: 2018-01-29

IJB is accepted for inclusion in Scopus


We proudly announce that IJB is indexed in Scopus which is the largest abstract and citation database of peer-reviewed literature from more than 5,000 publishers.

Posted: 2017-12-18

Virtual Issue: Stem Cell in Bioprinting


International Journal of Bioprinting presents the latest state-of-art of stem cell in bioprinting.

Wai Yee Yeong

Posted: 2017-11-28 More...
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